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Sydney Cleans Up after Worst Storms for 30 years

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Sydney Clean Up after Worst Storms on Track

Sydney storm DAMAGE- Photos show damage caused by severe weather in NSW

On 20 January 2020 a short but severe storm struck New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory (ACT). Sydney, the Hunter Region, the Riverina and South Coast were all affected by the weather event.

Roofs were blown off, trains were halted and people trapped in vehicles by fallen trees, and two persons were hit by lightning whilst sightseeing in Katoomba in the Blue Mountains. Large hailstones and winds over 110 km/h were experienced. Many thousands of motor vehicles were badly damaged by hail and many were written off.

The event was declared a catastrophe by the National Insurance Council. The cost of the storm, in the ACT alone, was estimated to be over A$500,000,000.

There are currently thousands of Hail-damaged cars ACT cars being auctioned of in Australia at very low prices. However, the cost of repairing hail-damaged cars is very high even using the new “dent removal technology”.

From 7-10 February, many areas on the east coast of New South Wales received heavy and continuous rain, the heaviest falls for thirty years. 391.6 millimetres (15.42 in) of rain fell over the four days in Sydney, more than three times the February average!

Flooding was extensive, including areas, such as Lake Conjola, that had been devastated by bushfires about 6 weeks earlier.

The rain did help extinguish many still burning bushfires, and greatly improved the levels of dams after years of drought replenishing the Warragamba Dam the main dam for Sydney water to over 80% full.

Power supply, trains, ferries and road transport were disrupted by flooding, fallen trees and washouts.

Areas of the Northern Beaches, such as Collaroy, were damaged by waves more than 5 metres (16 ft) high.

 

Emergency services worked day and night to respond to roof and window damage, fallen trees and electrical hazards.

Sydney wet weather finally extinguished Gospers Mountain ‘mega-blaze’, flooding clean-up continues across NSW

 The fire, which burned through more than 512,000 hectares after it was ignited by lightning strikes in a remote forested area on October 26, last year was once considered “too big to put out”.

The Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) said the past four days in Sydney had been the wettest since 1990, with a combined 391.6 millimetres of rain falling.

The clean-up continued for nearly two weeks and the SES urged people in Sydney to stay home from work in the week after the storms after dozens of schools were closed and several evacuation orders were put in place in the week 9 to 16 February.

There were many complaints that Power was not reconnected by Ausgrid until well over 7 days with some cases stretched out to 10 or even 12 days.10 days after the original Sunday storm between the 9 and 10 February.

“Everywhere has been hit, it’s hard to pinpoint where it’s worst,” Matt Kirby from the SES said.

The rain has, however, meant the Warragamba Dam — which supplies 80 per cent of Sydney’s water soon filled up to 80 per cent capacity.

Just weeks ago it was a dangerously low  42 per cent.

 

“This is going to make a considerable difference to Sydney’s water situation,” Water NSW spokesperson Tony Webber said.

The Insurance Council of Australia has already declared the weekend a “catastrophe”, with around 10,000 claims lodged yesterday.

Ausgrid accused of 3rd world standards in a first-world nation

Complaints about AUSGRID continue as at its peak there were about 90,000 homes remain without power in NSW for up to 10 days and there was a shortage of trained technical staff to deal with this crisis.

Ausgrid technicians were joined by several hundred additional staff from energy providers in other states including Queensland and Tasmania to assist those still off the grid.

The Insurance Council of Australia has declared the rain event a “catastrophe”

The Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) said the past four days in Sydney had been the wettest since 1990, with a combined 391.6 millimetres of rain falling.

The torrential downpour has thrown the city and Sydney’s outer suburbs into disarray, with flash flooding, evacuation orders, trees toppling onto cars and disrupted train services.

Around 200 people have so far been rescued after driving into floodwaters.

NSW Maritime Services said a number of boats had been sunk by the turbulent conditions at sea.

Two weeks later there were again severe thunderstorms which again caused a degree of damage and powerful ocean waves and surf caused by pressure from a Queensland Cyclone meant that most Sydney Beaches were closed for prolonged periods. Beaches across Sydney were closed for many days with ex-tropical cyclone Desi sending huge waves to batter the city’s coastline.

The Bureau of Meteorology warned that “Severe thunderstorms are likely to produce damaging winds, large – possibly giant – hailstones and heavy rainfall that may lead to flash flooding in the warning area over the next several hours,”

Beaches across Sydney were closed for many days with ex-tropical cyclone Uesi sending huge waves to batter the city’s coastline.

The huge swell didn’t just create dangerous water conditions but dumped masses of storm debris on the sand.
Ausgrid technicians will be joined by 100 additional staff from energy providers in other states including Queensland and Tasmania to assist those still off the grid.