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Celebrate Lunar New Year at the Art Gallery of NSW

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Celebrate Lunar New Year at the Art Gallery of NSW
The Art Gallery of New South Wales is delighted to announce its 2019 Lunar New Year Program. Spanning nine days, the Gallery’s program is an opportunity for visitors to discover the traditions of this ancient celebration and start the new year inspired by Asian art and culture.

Welcome in the Year of the Pig with the spectacle of a lion dance, learn about the traditions of tea drinking and calligraphy, and get hands-on with our drop-in family artmaking workshops. Also on offer is a special Lunar New Year themed Art After Hours on Wednesday 6 February with a range of free events for everyone.

The 2019 Lunar New Year program coincides with the launch of the exhibition Heaven and earth in Chinese art: treasures from the National Palace Museum, Taipei which presents some of the highest artistic achievements across 5000 years of Chinese history. Fittingly for the Year of the Pig, the exhibition features one of the museum’s most beloved objects which draws thousands of admirers a day, The Meat-shaped stone (Qing dynasty 1644-1911), a piece of dongpo pork carved from jasper and set in a decorative gold stand.

To celebrate the Lunar New Year ticket holders to Heaven and earth in Chinese art will be able to view the exhibition accompanied by a live performance of Chinese music by Meya Music Studio – see the event page for performance times.

Guided tours of Heaven and earth in Chinese art in MandarinCantonese and Korean will be available as part of the Lunar New Year program and until the close of the exhibition.

During the opening weekend of the Lunar New Year program Gallery visitors can witness the drumming, costumes and skill of the ancient Chinese tradition of the lion dance; encounter Caishen, god of prosperity, as he journeys through the Gallery handing out red packets with auspicious phrases; and families can create their own playful, paper pig in a free artmaking activity.

On Wednesday at Art After Hours the evening begins with lion dancing and calligraphy demonstrations from the Australian Oriental Calligraphy Society who will create handwritten phrases of wealth and prosperity to take home. Then journalist, TV screenwriter and author Benjamin Law will take the stage with Adam Liaw one of Australia’s favourite cooks, authors and commentators to discuss Asian culture and the influence of their shared Chinese heritage in their work and daily lives. The night’s festivities will close with a live performance by Australian award-winning singer and songwriter Sophie Koh, who marries a love of pop music with a background in classical piano.

The Gallery’s Lunar New Year program continues until Sunday 9 February with family activities; a chance to learn from master calligraphers; and a second opportunity to meet Caishen, god of prosperity.

The Art Gallery of NSW’s Lunar New Year programming is part of the City of Sydney 2019 Lunar New Year Festival.through the Gallery handing out red packets with auspicious phrases; and families can create their own playful, paper pig in a free artmaking activity.

Lion dancing at the Art Gallery of NSW
Heaven and earth in Chinese art: treasures from the National Palace Museum, Taipei
2 February – 5 May 2019

 

TICKETED

 

Heaven and earth in Chinese art: treasures from the National Palace Museum, Taipei is a rare opportunity to see some of the highest artistic achievements across 5000 years of Chinese history.

 

The National Palace Museum, Taipei, holds one of the finest collections of Chinese art in the world. Accumulated by emperors over centuries, this collection was, for hundreds of years, accessible only to the imperial elite. It is now rarely seen outside Taipei.

 

Celebrating the rich heritage of Chinese civilisation through the ancient concept of tian ren he yi— unity or harmony between heaven, nature and humanity – Heaven and earth in Chinese art presents a series of 87 artworks including paintings, calligraphy, illustrated books, bronzes, ceramics, jade and wood carvings, dating from the Neolithic period to the nineteenth century.

 

This is the first time the collection has travelled to the southern hemisphere and it is unlikely to be seen in Australia again. The Art Gallery of NSW in Sydney is the exclusive venue.