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90 Percent of Australians Oppose the Chinese Communist Party: Survey

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90 Percent of Australians Oppose the Chinese Communist Party: Survey

 

Ninety percent of Australians are opposed to the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), one of Australia’s leading thinktank’s has revealed.

 

A Lowy Institute’s 2021 survey—of 2,222 Australian adults—found that while two-thirds of Australians had positive views about Chinese people, Chinese culture and history, an overwhelming 90 percent of Australians were strongly opposed to China’s communist system of government, military activities in Australian regions, and the Chinese state’s investment in a major Australian company.

Associate Professor at the University of Sydney and expert in the U.S-China relations Salvator Babones told The Epoch Times that Australians’ shift in attitude towards the communist regime was “not surprising” as “most people will defend their own country in the face of foreign attacks.”

But the Lowy Institute Foreign Policy Program Director Natasha Kassam commented that it was unusual for views about nations to decline so drastically over a short period of time.

“The endless list of bilateral irritants and concerning stories—from the crackdown in Hong Kong to the detention of the Uyghurs, sanctions on Australian industries and the plight of Australian citizens in China—has driven the relationship, and driven public perception, to rock bottom,” she told the ABC.

This year also marks a turning point for Australians’ trust in the Chinese regime, which dropped to a ten-year low of 16 percent, with CCP leader Xi Jinping receiving fewer votes of confidence than Russian President Vladimir Putin, and only slightly more than North Korean leader Kim Jong-un.

Further for the first time, the majority of Australians (63 percent) also saw China as a security threat rather than an economic partner.

The poll also showed that concerns about China’s interference in Australian politics soared to over 80 percent, with foreign cyber-attacks perceived as the biggest threats to the country’s vital interests.

Associate Professor at the University of Sydney and expert in the U.S-China relations Salvator Babones told The Epoch Times that Australians’ shift in attitude towards the communist regime was “not surprising” as “most people will defend their own country in the face of foreign attacks.”

But the Lowy Institute Foreign Policy Program Director Natasha Kassam commented that it was unusual for views about nations to decline so drastically over a short period of time.

“The endless list of bilateral irritants and concerning stories—from the crackdown in Hong Kong to the detention of the Uyghurs, sanctions on Australian industries and the plight of Australian citizens in China—has driven the relationship, and driven public perception, to rock bottom,” she told the ABC.

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