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NSW ENVIRONMENTAL CITIZEN OF THE YEAR AWARDED TO THE BIN CHICKEN

NSW ENVIRONMENTAL CITIZEN OF THE YEAR AWARDED

TO THE BIN CHICKEN

 

A Western Sydney community recycling project called “The Bin Chicken” has been named the 2022 NSW Environmental Citizen of the Year by the NSW Government on World Environment Day.

Minister for Environment James Griffin congratulated the winner and all the nominees for their initiatives that help protect and conserve the environment while growing community spirit.

 

“Grassroots initiatives are what make our communities great, and the Environmental Awards encourage community champions, everyday individuals and local organisations that are improving our environment,” Mr Griffin said.

 

“From recycling and litter reduction, to land care, creating community gardens and protecting our wildlife – this year’s Environmental Awards nominees are extraordinary, and their perseverance in times of hardship should be applauded.”

Alexis Bowen (pictured above) started “The Bin Chicken” initiative two years ago in the Campbelltown region after picking up litter with her children every evening while on a walk.

 

Within five weeks, they had collected more than 5,000 single use drink containers.

 

The Bin Chicken aims to reduce recyclable material entering landfill and inspire the community to use the Return and Earn deposit scheme to return more money to local sports clubs, day care centres and a community pantry that contains food to help those in need.

 

The Environmental Award is part of the annual NSW Local Citizen of the Year Awards held on Australia Day, where members of the public are invited by their local councils to nominate fellow citizens.

 

Chair of the Australia Day Council of NSW Andrew Parker congratulated the winner and all nominees on their inspiring environmental projects deserving recognition.

 

“The Awards acknowledge the incredible efforts of individuals and organisations that have risen to the challenge to tackle environmental issues – every project large or small makes a positive impact for NSW,” Mr Parker said.

 

The state winner of the NSW Environmental Citizen of the Year Awards receives $3,000 and the runner-up will receive $1,000 to support their community initiative.

 

For more information on the winner, runner-up and all the nominees, visit www.australiaday.com.au

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